Tag: geek tendencies

Mysterious letters start arriving…

A few weeks ago a letter came to the house, addressed to my kids. It was in a plain envelope, with the address typed onto the front.  Local postmark. Inside, it read: 'base 4757 17 september 2037 dear dexter and euan i almost cant beleeve this is going to work. but its worth a shot. theres a masheen here. its big and brown with a metal keybord and lether straps. we arent allowed to use it. the grown ups have there own plans for it. maybe there worried were going to brake it. i type into the masheen and it sends a mesij into the past. about twenty years into the past, if ive set it up rite. if this works the way they say it does, the mesij will bounce off a receever stashun in your time, and if thats working it will make a print out and mail…

My name is Becky and I’m addicted to stationery

Photo: Hawkexpress When I was 8 years old, I used to take my pocket money to this cutesy craft shop in town that sold erasers in the shape of adorable Japanese cartoon animals, metallic unicorn stickers dispensed via a roll, and plastic wallets of miniature coloured pencils.  Man, I loved that shop. While some kids worshipped at the altar of Sugar (a religion I've dabbled in over the years), my true calling was always Stationery. Along with a couple of friends I created a secret society dedicated to our shared sacred reverence for mechanical pencils.  The extension mechanism!  The extra-slim lead refills!  The tiny storage plastic box for storing the refills! A secret club so bizarre that a neighbour studying child psychology wrote a paper about us. Nowadays I often write directly onto a Word document, or into WordPress.  But if I'm feeling stressed, I turn to pen and paper. I have Moleskine notebooks on my Amazon…

Criticism as crime scene

Photo: Tony Webster Even when criticism comes from someone you trust and respect, someone who has your best interests as a writer at heart, and who's guided you well in the past, it's hard not to have an immediate, emotional reaction. You've worked hard on creating something, and now it's been trashed and trampled.  The dismay and 'Oh God, what now?!' is reminiscent of discovering a burglary. Of course, the critic is not a criminal. She's doing her job, she's helping you make the book better. But still. I've recently been reading The Organized Mind by Daniel Levitin. Levitin, a neuroscientist, explains the human brain is hardwired to organise information - the world around us - into categories. By harnessing our innate powers of categorisation, and externalising the complex contents of our brains (into systems, lists, notebooks, spreadsheets) we free ourselves up to do the important work of creative thinking: making connections, generating…